Exploring Oslo, Norway: Mobility Around the City

VOI

The City of Oslo is preparing for a car-free city  centre and is almost there Equipped with electrified transport system,  all city-dwellers and visitors can easily move in and around the city freely, easily and quite conveniently with a carbon footprint of zero!  Isn’t that a great example for traveling kids- how to have it all with class no damage to environment? IT  IS!

We love Oslo, The European Green Capital for 2019.

Oslo is the capital city of Norway and has a population of 658,390. The city is surrounded by the Marka Forest, a nationally protected area, and the Oslo Fjord, both connected by a number of waterways. Oslo’s approach to conserving its natural areas and restoring its waterway network is just one of the many reasons why it won the European Green Capital Award for 2019.

The city’s waterways have been subject to a new revolutionary strategy which has completely reversed the previous approach of enclosing these channels. They are now being actively re-opened in order to make them accessible for people, to efficiently manage stormwater and facilitate development and restoration of habitat.

Tackling climate change is a high priority for Oslo. The city aims to cut emissions by 50% by 2020 (compared to 1990) and to be carbon neutral by 2050. Oslo has introduced a range of integrated measures to achieve these ambitious targets, for example, by promoting zero emissions transport. The city has become the ‘Electric Vehicle Capital of the World’ with 30% of all vehicles now sold in the city being electric.

Improvements in cycling and public transport infrastructure, the introduction of car free zones, and encouraging the use of electric vehicles, will not only help the city reach its climate goals, it will also greatly reduce air and noise pollution, and enhance the urban environment for its citizens.

Innovation and the promotion of new jobs in the circular economy is a priority for Oslo and the city is at the forefront of circular use of available resources. Biogas produced from bio-waste and city sewage is used to fuel city buses and waste trucks.

Oslo also established the ‘Business for Climate Network’ to foster cooperation between the business community, citizens and NGOs in addressing the impact business operations have on the climate.

In 2016, the city introduced a ‘Climate Budget’an initiative consisting of 42 separate measures across three sectors: energy and the built environment, transport, and resources. Carbon Dioxide emissions are now being counted in the same way a financial budget would account for funding. The unique ‘Climate Budget’ is one of the main initiatives that the City of Oslo is driving to reach its goal of 50% emissions reduction by 2020.

Exploring the city, the culture of green city is very evident. One thing that the kids enjoyed a lot  are the scooters easily rentable around the city. We tried VOI Scooters and the kids had a blast. Our eldest traveller who’s so into the rules of wearing helmet while using the scooter was not comfortable disobeying them, so we have to cut our experience short – well done her!

 

FUN AND ENVIRONMENT FRIENDLY -and yes, get us to places we want to explore more!world
FUN AND ENVIRONMENT FRIENDLY -and yes, get us to places we want to explore more!
Scooters everywhere –wwoooo!!! Shared electric scooters to the streets of Oslo.
Jump on a scooter anytime and ride wherever in the city – all free from emissions.
FUN AND ENVIRONMENT FRIENDLY -and yes, get us to places we want to explore more!

 

 

Scooters everywhere –wwoooo!!! Shared electric scooters to the streets of Oslo.
Jump on a scooter anytime and ride wherever in the city – all free from emissions.
Scooters everywhere –wwoooo!!! Shared electric scooters to the streets of Oslo.
Jump on a scooter anytime and ride wherever in the city – all free from emissions.
National Theatre Metro Station — Shared electric scooters to the streets of Oslo.
Jump on a scooter anytime and ride wherever in the city – all free from emissions.

 

Global warming is real – it is man-made and it is an important problem. But it is not the end of the world. We need to show the kids that efforts are being done to address this real problem.

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Exploring Oslo,Norway: Tjuvholmen

 

Tjuvholmen is a neighborhood on a peninsula sticking out from Aker Brygge into the Oslofjord. At the tip of the peninsula, next to the sculpture park, is an outdoor bathing area. The water leads out to the Inner Oslofjord.

A very cloudy and rainy morning in Tjuvholmen. Tjuvholmen is a neighborhood on a peninsula sticking out from Aker Brygge into the Oslofjord

The  Tjuvholmen Square great for kids, there are a lot of non-conforming scenarios aka ideas that challenges the norm– from naked sculptures to messages around the dining areas – expect a good number of questions from traveling kids.

 

WHAT IF?? -If we killed humans at the same rate as we kill animals, it would take17 days to wipe out the entire human specifies.

Look up and play cool – kids are watching!
Tjuvholmen on a brighter day!
Tjuvholmen horse and our worldschooler with a big smile. 

 

Visit Oslo notes the  Tjuvholmen is a very recent addition to Oslo’s varied collection of boroughs. The buildings that make up the area are drawn by some 20 different architects, creating a concentrated display of current trends in architecture. Tjuvholmen is also characterised by elaborate outdoor spaces, including a city beach and several humorous outdoor artworks.At the point where Tjuvholmen meets the fjord you find one of Oslo’s main attractions, master architect Renzo Piano’s Astrup Fearnley Museum.Tjuvholmen may be knew in Oslo but this place will be the closest to our traveling family’s hearts in Oslo.

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Kon-Tiki Museum

“In my experience, it is rarer to find a really happy person in a circle of millionaires than among vagabonds.” – Thor Heyerdahl
Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947

Another Norwegian explorer breaking the ocean norm– why is that NOT surprising!

Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947. He is obviously an adventurer-at-heart, an ethnographer in profession with a background in zoology, botany, and geography. In his famous Kon-Tiki expedition in 1947, he sailed 8,000 km across the Pacific Ocean in a hand-built raft from South America to the Tuamotu Islands. The expedition was designed to demonstrate that ancient people could have made long sea voyages, creating contacts between separate cultures. Heyerdahl also proposed that Azerbaijan was the site of an ancient advanced civilization. He believed that natives migrated north through waterways to present-day Scandinavia.

In 1984, he was appointed a government scholar and further adventures followed with voyages on the Ra and Tigris reed boats.

Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947; This traveling girl’s first visit March 2018

Turknoys and Kon-Tiki, during their previous visit last winter (November 2018)

It’s fantastic to experience original rafts and up to date exhibitions on Heyerdahl’s expedition- the Kon-tiki, being the most famous, Ra, Tigris, Easter Island, Fatuhiva, Tucume, Galapagos, spelunking, under water exhibition and more!

 What a  really admirable explorer  Thor Heyerdahl. Probably the coolest Thor we’ve read about, way better than the one with the hammer.

Kon-Tiki, the greatest sea adventure of our time.
Kon-Tiki, the greatest sea adventure of our time.

More of Thor Heyerdahl’s famous quotes illustrate his determined and adventurous personality:

“Some people believe in fate, others don’t. I do, and I don’t. It may seem at times as if invisible fingers move us about like puppets on strings. But for sure, we are not born to be dragged along. We can grab the strings ourselves and adjust our course at every crossroad, or take off at any little trail into the unknown.” – Thor Heyerdahl

“Borders? I have never seen one. But I have heard they exist in the minds of some people.” – Thor Heyerdahl

And to the last quote, we concur…what borders?!

 

 

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Aker Brygge

We are all born in a little port but not all of us sail the vast oceans.” – Mehmet Murat íldan

View of Aker Brygge — an elegant neighbourhood in central Oslo, Norway

Aker Brygge is a neighbourhood in central Oslo, Norway. It is a popular area for shopping, dining and entertainment, as well a high-end residential area. For our family’s third visit to Oslo, we have chosen to enjoy these area and we didn’t regret this even for a tiny second.

Aker Brygge – their playground for 17 days! ❤️

Universe happens for us — we want a yacht and really, that’s not a lot. To be more specific, a Norway-based yacht 😄
cruises depart day in and day out for passing through the scenic Oslo Fjord.

At street level Aker Brygge a vibrant commercial district, and the large open-air areas and indoor shopping street are often used for photo exhibitions, concerts and pop-up events for fashion, art and culture.

For more than a century Aker Brygge was the site of a shipyard, Akers Mekaniske Verksted. The architecture at Aker Brygge is distinctive, with its combination of old, venerable shipyard buildings and modern architecture.

Part of the Central area, Aker Brygge’s pier is fabulous and majestic, to say the least. Eateries outdoor tables serve upscale Nordic, Italian or casual menus like burgers and steak. There are a lot of Oslo food trucks to choose from. A popular summer boat bar is moored nearby, ferries and cruises depart day in and day out for passing through the scenic Oslo Fjord.

Local cultural draws include the Nobel Peace Center, with exhibits on the famous prize and the striking Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.

 

Local cultural draws include the Nobel Peace Center still under renovation for more improvements!

Enjoying the almost midnight sun in Aker, Brygge Oslo, Norway

striking Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.

Aker Brygge is a port of happiness and elegance in Oslo, Norway!

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Vikingskipshuset, Viking Museum

Visit Vikingskipshuset for a face to face experience with some of the world’s greatest Viking treasures! The best preserved Viking ships in the world and unique burial artifacts from boat graves around Oslo Fjords. These ships have been on voyages of the sea before they became the final resting place to their wealthy owners.

Incredible woodcarvings, mysterious skeleton remains and Viking era mood; definitely out of the ordinary!

Face to face with some of the world’s greatest Viking treasures!
Incredible woodcarvings, face to face with Viking artifacts seem surreal 😀

 

The Ship Graves

The Viking Ship Museum houses four Viking ship burials from Oslo Fjord area: those found in Oseberg, Gokstad, Tune and Borre. All four were excavated  between 1852 and 1904. Three of the graves contained ships that have survived to this day, the Oseberg ship was built AD 820, the Gokstad ship shortly before AD 900 and the Tune ship AD 910.

The three ships had been at sea for several years before they were pulled ashore and used as burial ships. The dead were placed in burial chambers built on board the ships. They were buried with generous supplies of food and drink, various animals and a large number of objects

The Oseberg ship was used as grave ship for two women, while Gokstad and Tune servedas grave ships for men. Most of the objects in Oseberg and Gokstad graves were well preserved because the ships had been buried in moist ground and covered with clay and turf. Both Oseberg and Gokstad had been looted in the Viking Age; no jewelry or weapons were found.

The Discovery of the Oseberg Ship

The Oseberg ship burial was  discovered in the autumn of 1903 on the Lille Oseberg farm in Vestfold county. The following summer excavations were carried out, led by professor of archeology Gabriel Gustafson. While the excavation itself took five months, it would take 21 years to complete the conservation and  restoration of the ship and its grave finds.

The ship was complete but crushed when it was found, The many pieces had to be slowly dried before being pieced back together. The Vikingskipshuset consists of over 90% of the original wood.

Two Wealthy Women

When excavating the Oseberg Ship in 1904, the archeologist found the remains of two women. One of them could have been in her fifties when she died, the other around 70-80 years. But who is the main person in the grave?

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role. Their kin and community used the ship grave and the burial ritual and to mark the importance of the women. Is it possible that one of the women was sacrificed to accompany the other to the grave?

Both women were approximately 153 cm tall. The younger woman had healthy teeth with little sign of wear, indicating that she had enjoyed a good diet. Throughout her life she had used a metal toothpick to clean her teeth. A broken collar bone shows that was injured some  weeks before her death, but the skeletal remains do not reveal the cause of her death.

The skeleton of the older women shows signs that she had been seriously ill during childhood. In old age, she suffered from osteoporosis, a lumbar fracture, two fused neck vertebrae and a knee  injury, which most likely had made her stoop and walk with a limp. The woman suffered from advanced cancer, and had probably been in great pain in her final years.

 

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role

Prototype and functional Oseberg Ship in Tonsberg, Norway

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Oslo rådhus, Oslo City Hall

“If I have a thousand ideas and only one turns out to be good, I am satisfied.” – Alfred Nobel

Oslo City Hall (Norwegian: Oslo rådhus) is a municipal building in country capital, Oslo, located in the northern part of Pipervika neighborhood and faces Oslofjord. It houses the city council, the city’s administration and various other municipal organisations. The building as it stands today was constructed between 1931 and 1950. It was designed by architects Arnstein Arneberg and Magnus Poulsson.

Our Small Friends Exhibition besides the Oslo City Hall

Oslo City Hall is built of red brick  and has two towers, one 63 meters tall and other 66 meters tall. The bricks used are larger than what was typical at the time of construction, but are roughly the same size as bricks used in the Middle Ages. The bricks – measuring approximately 27,5 x 13 x 8,5 cm – were produced by Hovin Teglverk in Oslo. The eastern tower has a set of 49 bells

On December 10 each year, during the death anniversary of Alfred Nobel, the Oslo City Hall hosts the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in which the annual laureate gives his or her lecture and is awarded the medal and diploma.

A podium for the laureate and the Nobel Committee is erected in the far end of the hall for each ceremony. The Norwegian Royal Family and Prime Minister attends the ceremony.

Inaugurated in 1950, Oslo City Hall is the city’s administrative body and the seat of the City Council.
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The building has been decorated by great Norwegian art from 1900-1950, with motifs from Norwegian history, culture and working life.
Future Nobel Peace Prize Laureate – it’s in his smile already!

On December 10 each year, during the death anniversary of Alfred Nobel, the Oslo City Hall hosts the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in which the annual laureate gives his or her lecture and is awarded the medal and diploma.

There are free tours inside the Oslo City Hall. Have you seen the interior of this administration building? 

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Our Small Friends

 

“In summer the empire of insects spreads.” ― Adam Zagajewski

This third time around in Oslo, we stayed in Aker Brygge and it’s fantastic. We get exposed to all things great and beautiful.

One fine day we were exploring the city, there’s a rainbow and there’s the “Our Small Friends” photo gallery that made us stopped for almost an hour.

In the exhibition, “Our Small Friends” , we meet the insect face to face. Jannicke Wiik-Nielsen, a scientist at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute, has taken these portraits using electron microscope, which magnifies the object under examination many thousand of times. Since the electron microscope is restricted to black and white photographs, the scientist/ artist has colorized the images to provide greater contrast and detail.

Have you ever stared directly at an insect and felt small? 🤗

Don’t you just love Oslo. Walking around the city always make you feel better and smarter.

Have you ever stared directly at an insect and felt small?