On Family Values: Hope and Experience

“And patience [worketh] experience; and experience, hope” (Paul, Romans 5:4).

As Malcolm Gladwell argued in his bestseller book, Outliers, it takes 10,000 hours which is approximately 10 years of deliberate practice to become an expert.

With the goal to travel to 100 countries in10 years, that would make us seasoned family travellers. We’re onto our six years of happily traveling the kids along our family adventures, and by far, explored 36 countries, including the new territory we are currently exploring at the moment, Canada!

Yes, there are certain traveling tasks that feel so routine, like appointment with embassies, visa applications, packing, adjusting to jet lag and body clock. These are great expertise to have as a working professional. Patience with documents, mastery of own body sleep and up close encounters with countries diplomats… necessary skills of a future CEO or founder of a corporation, and we can discuss further why!

However, more importantly, though skills which we are yet to master, there are hormones, grumpiness and boredom.

Hormones, there traveling women vs. two patient men makes a team. This means at the very least, two weeks of PMS (premenstrual syndrome) of emotions, the struggle is real. Acknowledging this, makes the battle easier, though we can only monitor, not control. Experiences on the pattern makes it understandable and yes, conquerable, if not tolerable for the surrounding men around these women.

So you think you can balance girls’ hormones?! 😘

Grumpiness, or bad hair day moments, or waking up at the wrong side of the bed, is also normal during family travels. One day something too personal embarrassing the other. Too close for comfort takes patience and experience, too.

This traveling little man in the middle, gives a lot of patience to the family. He’s smile always cure anybody’s grumpiness!

Boredom, because what parents may find interesting, may be so very boring for the kids and the other way around. We would not be telling the entire truth to our traveling adventures, if we would lying if we say “everybody loves visiting .. insert name of place/ country/ region… Nope, most of the time, there’s someone who will rain on somebody’s parade when family travels together.

Kids these age will pick Legoland anytime over any museums, that we know. And parents don’t particularly enjoy Legoland. It takes a lot of give and take among family members to enjoy a long period of travel!

BUT, there are also the AHA moments, the wonder-at-first-sight moments, laugh-out-loud-together-moments, we-actually-saw-what-happened-together-moments.

AND… these moments turn into memories. Memories that would be from imprints on their lives and define the decisions and actions they would do in the future, what will define who they will be by choice.

Experience together over any material things… no argument there. We’re armed with experience-building patience, even if it takes 10,000 more hours together!

Living up to our main family value, we really are a hopeful bunch.

Peace on Earth is possible. Travel with family?! Maybe possible. 😜

New York, The City That Dreams Blissfully!

Free educational and fun family activities Turknoy style aka deep-rooted into our family lifestyle are readily available in New York. There are lots of ideas, discussions and pondering mover aching feet and full stomach. Our senses are all overwhelmed.

Broadway is to talent and making it big in the world;

She’s a Harry Potter fanatic, an: watching the play brought lots of reading memories, lessons and bliss moments with Albus and Scorpius! #KeepTheSecrets (Broadway, June 2019)
Our first Broadway performance experience. How the kids have grown since the . (Broadway, October 2017)
When at home, we watch Late Show a lot. So kids know Stephen Colbert more than.. uummm Tom Hanks! 😂

Times Square is to branding and consumerism and making it known in the world

Times Square with family means discussion on economics, world inequality, wants over needs and lots of business ideas! (Times Square, June 2019)
Times Square, October 2017

Then, then… .. Financial District is money management and getting power over money in the world!

And until then… let’s get all the money vibes from The Wall Street Bull’s Balls. Legend has it that those who touch them will have prosperous and wealthy life. So, oohmmm we go. Seriously, we saw a Hindu lady who was actually doing this like a solemn prayer. So why not?

Our little ladies and the Charging Bull of Wall Street
Grab the bulls by balls and we’re set for life! Girl power!
All that financial wealth vibe with the ball and the Bull. 😀
Happiness is grabbing the Bull by the balls!

“My bull is a symbol for America. My bull is a symbol of prosperity and for strength.” – Sicilian artist Arturo Di Modica, creator of The Charging Bull.

Broadway, Times Square or Wall Street, New York can make dreams come true for this fearless and are able to stand tall and proud.

Freedom is NOT the absence of fear… but by being able to act fearless.. whoever we may be!

World citizens, worldschooler or not, New York sets an example. It may be the place, it may be the city’s history, it may be capitalism, it may be a lot of things… yet we firmly believe that these ideals can be replicated.. anywhere in the world. Dreams are dreams without time zone and coordinates. With positivity and a lot of hard work, sprinkled with luck (bulls’ balls!) dreams do come true, whatever they may be.

We don’t use ❤️ to reflect our emotions towards any city easily. We’re snobs sometimes… but New York she really ❤️💛💚💙💜

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Munchmuseet, Munch Museum

“From my rotting body, flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity.” – Edvard Munch

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts.

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts
The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

Edvard Munch was one of Modernism’s most significant artists

Edvard Munch was one of Modernism’s most significant artists

Edvard Munch was one of Modernism’s most significant artists. He is popularly known for his tenacious experimentation with painting, graphic art, drawing, sculpture, photo and film.

Munch was very good at portraying extreme emotions in painting, and he wanted to get a strong reaction from his viewers. His most famous work is “The Scream,” which definitely evokes intense feelings.

 

Munch left approximately 1,150 paintings,17, 800 prints,4,500 watercolours, drawings and 13 sculptures, as well as writing and  literary notes to Oslo, Norway. The city is currently constructing a bigger Munch Museum close to the Opera House where Museum 2020 will rise.

“A work of art can only come from the interior of man. Art is the form of the image formed upon the nerves, heart, brain and eye of man.” – Edvard Munch

 

 

On Family Values: Hope and Goals

“Hope is not a prognostication; it is an orientation that no matter how things turn out, they can have meaning.” –  Vaclav Havel

Family travelers are imparting the value of consistent hope. This is one of the many reasons we drag the kids around the world. Well, technically, just around Asia, Europe and North America for now. Hopefully, around the world soon enough.

This is our “Teddy Bear” in Doha airport, Hamad International Airport… the moment we pass this bear… hope hope hope Festival for all the very best out of our comfort zones!!
From one airport to the next (this time Oslo Airport) – one huge way to burst that comfort bubble!

When a traveling family run towards a train station hoping to catch the train on time, that’s hoping for the best.

When a traveling family is  almost get denied entry by an Immigration Officer to a country of destination because of visa application requirements concerns and all family members continue showing calm while presenting valid travel documents, that’s hoping for fairness and diplomacy.

When a first time family hikes in an unfavorable weather up a gorgeous landscape in a foreign country and keeps the hyper mood, that’s hoping for an awesome adventure.

When presented with a bad customer service and the traveling family maintain a good attitude towards all people, that’s hoping for the goodness of humanity.

Emily Dickinson may have written it in a poem  eras ago, but as family traveller, it is in our traveler’s literature pack.

“Hope”is a thing with feathers (By: Emily Dickinson) 

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –
And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –
I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Kon-Tiki Museum

“In my experience, it is rarer to find a really happy person in a circle of millionaires than among vagabonds.” – Thor Heyerdahl
Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947

Another Norwegian explorer breaking the ocean norm– why is that NOT surprising!

Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947. He is obviously an adventurer-at-heart, an ethnographer in profession with a background in zoology, botany, and geography. In his famous Kon-Tiki expedition in 1947, he sailed 8,000 km across the Pacific Ocean in a hand-built raft from South America to the Tuamotu Islands. The expedition was designed to demonstrate that ancient people could have made long sea voyages, creating contacts between separate cultures. Heyerdahl also proposed that Azerbaijan was the site of an ancient advanced civilization. He believed that natives migrated north through waterways to present-day Scandinavia.

In 1984, he was appointed a government scholar and further adventures followed with voyages on the Ra and Tigris reed boats.

Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947; This traveling girl’s first visit March 2018

Turknoys and Kon-Tiki, during their previous visit last winter (November 2018)

It’s fantastic to experience original rafts and up to date exhibitions on Heyerdahl’s expedition- the Kon-tiki, being the most famous, Ra, Tigris, Easter Island, Fatuhiva, Tucume, Galapagos, spelunking, under water exhibition and more!

 What a  really admirable explorer  Thor Heyerdahl. Probably the coolest Thor we’ve read about, way better than the one with the hammer.

Kon-Tiki, the greatest sea adventure of our time.
Kon-Tiki, the greatest sea adventure of our time.

More of Thor Heyerdahl’s famous quotes illustrate his determined and adventurous personality:

“Some people believe in fate, others don’t. I do, and I don’t. It may seem at times as if invisible fingers move us about like puppets on strings. But for sure, we are not born to be dragged along. We can grab the strings ourselves and adjust our course at every crossroad, or take off at any little trail into the unknown.” – Thor Heyerdahl

“Borders? I have never seen one. But I have heard they exist in the minds of some people.” – Thor Heyerdahl

And to the last quote, we concur…what borders?!

 

 

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Aker Brygge

We are all born in a little port but not all of us sail the vast oceans.” – Mehmet Murat íldan

View of Aker Brygge — an elegant neighbourhood in central Oslo, Norway

Aker Brygge is a neighbourhood in central Oslo, Norway. It is a popular area for shopping, dining and entertainment, as well a high-end residential area. For our family’s third visit to Oslo, we have chosen to enjoy these area and we didn’t regret this even for a tiny second.

Aker Brygge – their playground for 17 days! ❤️

Universe happens for us — we want a yacht and really, that’s not a lot. To be more specific, a Norway-based yacht 😄
cruises depart day in and day out for passing through the scenic Oslo Fjord.

At street level Aker Brygge a vibrant commercial district, and the large open-air areas and indoor shopping street are often used for photo exhibitions, concerts and pop-up events for fashion, art and culture.

For more than a century Aker Brygge was the site of a shipyard, Akers Mekaniske Verksted. The architecture at Aker Brygge is distinctive, with its combination of old, venerable shipyard buildings and modern architecture.

Part of the Central area, Aker Brygge’s pier is fabulous and majestic, to say the least. Eateries outdoor tables serve upscale Nordic, Italian or casual menus like burgers and steak. There are a lot of Oslo food trucks to choose from. A popular summer boat bar is moored nearby, ferries and cruises depart day in and day out for passing through the scenic Oslo Fjord.

Local cultural draws include the Nobel Peace Center, with exhibits on the famous prize and the striking Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.

 

Local cultural draws include the Nobel Peace Center still under renovation for more improvements!

Enjoying the almost midnight sun in Aker, Brygge Oslo, Norway

striking Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.

Aker Brygge is a port of happiness and elegance in Oslo, Norway!

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Vikingskipshuset, Viking Museum

Visit Vikingskipshuset for a face to face experience with some of the world’s greatest Viking treasures! The best preserved Viking ships in the world and unique burial artifacts from boat graves around Oslo Fjords. These ships have been on voyages of the sea before they became the final resting place to their wealthy owners.

Incredible woodcarvings, mysterious skeleton remains and Viking era mood; definitely out of the ordinary!

Face to face with some of the world’s greatest Viking treasures!
Incredible woodcarvings, face to face with Viking artifacts seem surreal 😀

 

The Ship Graves

The Viking Ship Museum houses four Viking ship burials from Oslo Fjord area: those found in Oseberg, Gokstad, Tune and Borre. All four were excavated  between 1852 and 1904. Three of the graves contained ships that have survived to this day, the Oseberg ship was built AD 820, the Gokstad ship shortly before AD 900 and the Tune ship AD 910.

The three ships had been at sea for several years before they were pulled ashore and used as burial ships. The dead were placed in burial chambers built on board the ships. They were buried with generous supplies of food and drink, various animals and a large number of objects

The Oseberg ship was used as grave ship for two women, while Gokstad and Tune servedas grave ships for men. Most of the objects in Oseberg and Gokstad graves were well preserved because the ships had been buried in moist ground and covered with clay and turf. Both Oseberg and Gokstad had been looted in the Viking Age; no jewelry or weapons were found.

The Discovery of the Oseberg Ship

The Oseberg ship burial was  discovered in the autumn of 1903 on the Lille Oseberg farm in Vestfold county. The following summer excavations were carried out, led by professor of archeology Gabriel Gustafson. While the excavation itself took five months, it would take 21 years to complete the conservation and  restoration of the ship and its grave finds.

The ship was complete but crushed when it was found, The many pieces had to be slowly dried before being pieced back together. The Vikingskipshuset consists of over 90% of the original wood.

Two Wealthy Women

When excavating the Oseberg Ship in 1904, the archeologist found the remains of two women. One of them could have been in her fifties when she died, the other around 70-80 years. But who is the main person in the grave?

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role. Their kin and community used the ship grave and the burial ritual and to mark the importance of the women. Is it possible that one of the women was sacrificed to accompany the other to the grave?

Both women were approximately 153 cm tall. The younger woman had healthy teeth with little sign of wear, indicating that she had enjoyed a good diet. Throughout her life she had used a metal toothpick to clean her teeth. A broken collar bone shows that was injured some  weeks before her death, but the skeletal remains do not reveal the cause of her death.

The skeleton of the older women shows signs that she had been seriously ill during childhood. In old age, she suffered from osteoporosis, a lumbar fracture, two fused neck vertebrae and a knee  injury, which most likely had made her stoop and walk with a limp. The woman suffered from advanced cancer, and had probably been in great pain in her final years.

 

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role

Prototype and functional Oseberg Ship in Tonsberg, Norway

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Oslo rådhus, Oslo City Hall

“If I have a thousand ideas and only one turns out to be good, I am satisfied.” – Alfred Nobel

Oslo City Hall (Norwegian: Oslo rådhus) is a municipal building in country capital, Oslo, located in the northern part of Pipervika neighborhood and faces Oslofjord. It houses the city council, the city’s administration and various other municipal organisations. The building as it stands today was constructed between 1931 and 1950. It was designed by architects Arnstein Arneberg and Magnus Poulsson.

Our Small Friends Exhibition besides the Oslo City Hall

Oslo City Hall is built of red brick  and has two towers, one 63 meters tall and other 66 meters tall. The bricks used are larger than what was typical at the time of construction, but are roughly the same size as bricks used in the Middle Ages. The bricks – measuring approximately 27,5 x 13 x 8,5 cm – were produced by Hovin Teglverk in Oslo. The eastern tower has a set of 49 bells

On December 10 each year, during the death anniversary of Alfred Nobel, the Oslo City Hall hosts the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in which the annual laureate gives his or her lecture and is awarded the medal and diploma.

A podium for the laureate and the Nobel Committee is erected in the far end of the hall for each ceremony. The Norwegian Royal Family and Prime Minister attends the ceremony.

Inaugurated in 1950, Oslo City Hall is the city’s administrative body and the seat of the City Council.
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The building has been decorated by great Norwegian art from 1900-1950, with motifs from Norwegian history, culture and working life.
Future Nobel Peace Prize Laureate – it’s in his smile already!

On December 10 each year, during the death anniversary of Alfred Nobel, the Oslo City Hall hosts the Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony in which the annual laureate gives his or her lecture and is awarded the medal and diploma.

There are free tours inside the Oslo City Hall. Have you seen the interior of this administration building? 

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Our Small Friends

 

“In summer the empire of insects spreads.” ― Adam Zagajewski

This third time around in Oslo, we stayed in Aker Brygge and it’s fantastic. We get exposed to all things great and beautiful.

One fine day we were exploring the city, there’s a rainbow and there’s the “Our Small Friends” photo gallery that made us stopped for almost an hour.

In the exhibition, “Our Small Friends” , we meet the insect face to face. Jannicke Wiik-Nielsen, a scientist at the Norwegian Veterinary Institute, has taken these portraits using electron microscope, which magnifies the object under examination many thousand of times. Since the electron microscope is restricted to black and white photographs, the scientist/ artist has colorized the images to provide greater contrast and detail.

Have you ever stared directly at an insect and felt small? 🤗

Don’t you just love Oslo. Walking around the city always make you feel better and smarter.

Have you ever stared directly at an insect and felt small?

A Worldschooler’s Day in Lillehammer, Norway

Quick quotes from the Traveling Parents before we pass the torch to our eldest worldschooler who is extremely passionate about exploring and writing:

“Every secret of a writer’ soul, every experience in his life, every quality of his mind, is written large in his works.” – Virginia Woolf

You got this, kyvelo! – Turknoy Parents

—-

Saturday, May 5, 2019; 8:00 AM.

The night before, Mom had mentioned something among the lines of waking up at 4:00 AM, and had even went as far as planting the bloody phone alarm bomb alongside my bed. Protest had been on the tip of my tongue, although I hadn’t mustered the courage to do so.

As much as this fact had threatened my usual sleep-stocked slumber, I had slept soundly nevertheless. I had managed to pry my eyes open to what I thought had been four hours of sleep, when Mom bludgeoned through the unfortunate door; halting in her tracks as I allegedly “slept” on, completely unnerved. I had been semi-conscious at the time, so I hadn’t completely deceived mother dear. Mutinously mumbling, Mom trudged back through the door, which much to my surprise, had managed a piteous “click”, as she shut it behind her.

I squirmed beneath my sheets, partially due to the psychotic steam that had practically originated from myself, as well as the fact that I had started envying my former frozen self the day before.

Worldschooler, proud and happy! She did wake up like this!

Fast forward, although not too much so as to deprive Mom of precious “reflection”; I had been seated at the dining table a few minutes ago, where I had went through the usual territorial dish disputes; which hadn’t been much use since Dad had knowingly distributed accordingly, wary to the single grain.

Kim had decided to grace us with his bed-headed presence shortly after I had finished, although soon enough he wasn’t far behind.

We arrived at Oslo Central Station pink-faced and breath deprived, tapping for the troublesome tickets furiously, for the train had been due to leave in the next six minutes. As soon as I had stepped foot on the train, it had heaved and huffed, gradually gaining speed as we sped through the greenery. We stumbled through the numerous occupied seats; the occupants of which made noises remarkably like the exasperated huffs originating from the train itself.

The view to Lillehammer is marvelous… my favorite sister thinks so, too!

Speeding through luscious lakes, and fanciful foliage, the train rocked here and there, lulling me into a dream-lavished snooze of which I had debated on whether this infamous “Lillehammer” really had anything to do with hammers at all.

I clenched my teeth as another ear-piercing ring rang through the air. I had woken a few minutes ago, and had fruitlessly been screwing my eyes tight, in hopes of returning to thoughts of mjolnir.

The two hour train ride had finally screeched to a stop. The staff door swung open, revealing the person I guessed was the conductor. I narrowed my eyes begrudgingly, as I couldn’t find a reason as to why a grown man was in need to “toot, toot!” every five minutes. I stepped off the train all too gladly, skipping the way to Lillehammer.

That is, until I had caught sight of exactly how steep their roads, as well as their pavements were. You attempt skipping on a surface where the tiniest nudge would make it perfectly acceptable as a wall.

Map at hand, we marched up up up, family members overlapping family members; desperate for the front position, desperate for the valid excuse of “waiting” for the rest.

“Museum”. My heart skipped a beat as I saw those letters peek out of the green landscape that my skin tone had done a remarkable job of mimicking. I stumbled towards the building, eyes bulging as a bus sped past. Nostrils flared, I huffed as we stepped into the museum.

st. “Museum”. My heart skipped a beat…

“I suppose it was worth it.” I thought grudgingly, although I dare not say it out loud in fear of being accused of sucking up. Dad drawled on about the Vikings in the 1800’s in custody of practically nothing, whilst I fought the urge to roll my eyes. Nothing, huh? An enormous expanse of green stretched as far as the eye could see, shades of mint, lime, and emerald dotted here and there. Houses clustered just above the crystal lake, although it wasn’t difficult so as to imagine it’s former pre-beach-house beauty.

I pressed a palm against the spruce-like wood the cabins consisted of, breathed the scent of worn wood. Mom had teased about taking care of time portals, although now I had the strange urge to seek one out. A river rushed nearby, it was ridiculously accessible.

An enormous expanse of green stretched as far as the eye could see, shades of mint, lime, and emerald dotted here and there. Houses clustered just above the crystal lake, although it wasn’t difficult so as to imagine it’s former pre-beach-house beauty.

Seeing, smelling, and feeling things that had such stories behind them was simply indescribable. I’m not a lazy writer, so I don’t say that to the advantage of a decrease of words, which the previous extremely detailed paragraphs should hold proof of.

I had LITERALLY trotted through time today, from Viking abodes, to the perfect, prim, and proper peoples and places of the following decades; I had thoroughly enjoyed the adventures today had held, as well as Lillehammer itself. The architectural astonishment, and the historical heaven I had experienced the moment I took my last excruciating step uphill had been one of the most memorable; despite the lack of hammers.

The architectural astonishment, and the historical heaven I had experienced the moment I took my last excruciating step uphill had been one of the most memorable; despite the lack of hammers.