New York, The City That Dreams Blissfully!

Free educational and fun family activities Turknoy style aka deep-rooted into our family lifestyle are readily available in New York. There are lots of ideas, discussions and pondering mover aching feet and full stomach. Our senses are all overwhelmed.

Broadway is to talent and making it big in the world;

She’s a Harry Potter fanatic, an: watching the play brought lots of reading memories, lessons and bliss moments with Albus and Scorpius! #KeepTheSecrets (Broadway, June 2019)
Our first Broadway performance experience. How the kids have grown since the . (Broadway, October 2017)
When at home, we watch Late Show a lot. So kids know Stephen Colbert more than.. uummm Tom Hanks! 😂

Times Square is to branding and consumerism and making it known in the world

Times Square with family means discussion on economics, world inequality, wants over needs and lots of business ideas! (Times Square, June 2019)
Times Square, October 2017

Then, then… .. Financial District is money management and getting power over money in the world!

And until then… let’s get all the money vibes from The Wall Street Bull’s Balls. Legend has it that those who touch them will have prosperous and wealthy life. So, oohmmm we go. Seriously, we saw a Hindu lady who was actually doing this like a solemn prayer. So why not?

Our little ladies and the Charging Bull of Wall Street
Grab the bulls by balls and we’re set for life! Girl power!
All that financial wealth vibe with the ball and the Bull. 😀
Happiness is grabbing the Bull by the balls!

“My bull is a symbol for America. My bull is a symbol of prosperity and for strength.” – Sicilian artist Arturo Di Modica, creator of The Charging Bull.

Broadway, Times Square or Wall Street, New York can make dreams come true for this fearless and are able to stand tall and proud.

Freedom is NOT the absence of fear… but by being able to act fearless.. whoever we may be!

World citizens, worldschooler or not, New York sets an example. It may be the place, it may be the city’s history, it may be capitalism, it may be a lot of things… yet we firmly believe that these ideals can be replicated.. anywhere in the world. Dreams are dreams without time zone and coordinates. With positivity and a lot of hard work, sprinkled with luck (bulls’ balls!) dreams do come true, whatever they may be.

We don’t use ❤️ to reflect our emotions towards any city easily. We’re snobs sometimes… but New York she really ❤️💛💚💙💜

A Worldschooler’s Day at Astrup Fearnley Museet

“Oslo’s contemporary art” is something that simply ceases to exist. From witnessing the art within the Astrup Fearnley Museet, I’ve come to terms with the fact that it’s solely hare-brained to categorize the art in such ways. Perhaps it had been easier to group masterpieces of which had been bizarre to the eye in a single group; although each and every piece had been produced with a pastiche of particular passions, each had been fashioned with idiosyncratic intentions. This is my opinion, due to the fact that I find hardship in distinguishing similitude between denim doused canvases, shopping cart creations, and paper-carved coups.

A perfect photo to illustrate the expressions during our visit at Oslo’s Modern Art

Based on my self-reflection, I distinguish a certain depth in “Oslo’s art”, the miniature brain-muddles it’d take a person to disentangle a sole piece, and the mystery that envelopes it, for unless you were to pry open the mind of the certain creator; you’d never truly fathom the depth that had originated from the marvelous masterpieces I had witnessed today.

Check out a simple version of my art based on my previous experiences in Oslo, Norway:

Let me know your thoughts.

A Worldschooler’s Day with 50,000 Art Sculptures of Grass Roots Square

She had been buried in bed for the past ten minutes, debating on whether it’d be worth it if she had finally dragged herself out; although when it had come to it, her body felt as if it weighed a ton. Her brain barked and brandished psychological threats, though her body displayed no signs of swaying.

She squinted her eyes against the rouge ray of white light that had found it’s way through the gaps between blinds as she wiggled her toes and stretched her spine. Her brain had swapped tactics, and was now shuffling through memories of homework that had yet to be thumbed through; coincidentally- or rather voluntarily loitering on certain sore spots.

Six seconds later she had found herself in the bathroom.

It wasn’t hard due to the fact that the rooms within their current apartment- like any other, had practically been pulverized among one another, and she had been able to cover the living room with what had been consisted of three sluggish strides; although it’d be difficult to deny the fact that the dread that lay within her notebooks had egged her on a tad.

She slouched in front of the wall mirror, much to her mother’s dismay. Her mother’s voice bounced about in her head, her face that had remarkably mimicked one of a Saber-toothed tiger at the time flashed before her eyes. She grasped her toothbrush, although she couldn’t help but straighten her spine. Her hair jutted out at every angle humanly possible, though as much as she fingered fruitlessly it had bounced back to it’s former maddening mane-like glory. It was definite. She was indeed related to ferocious Felidae.

She breathed in the cool, crisp air. Her shoes clicked against the damp pavement, as it was slightly drizzling. Rain patterned against the roof of her hoodie, a mollifying melody. She yearned to dampen her hair, although wasn’t quite as zealous at the thought of awaking sniveling and stuffy the day after. She clicked across the wooden bridge, the usual light tone of oak mirrored one of spruce once it had been drenched.

She proceeded to pass sculptures that would have been considered scandalous if not for knowing Norwegians, eyeing a few people she presumed had been posing for the wrong reasons.

20 minutes later, her clicks had become less enthusiastic; if anything, they had morphed into piteous shuffles. Dad had map at hand, cracked at the rim; although allegedly function-able nevertheless. She made a show of her discouragement plastered at face, frowning at what seemed like scraps of metal that had miraculously managed to cling onto one another; although her father- oblivious to the lack of approvement, sauntered off, offspring ambling afterwards.

Another 20 minutes later, after passing the scrap-metal-map among one another, as if the change in person would affect the topography itself; they had found themselves at the point where they had started, the sought-after Grass Root Square quite literally underfoot.

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Grass Root Square –https://turknoytravels100.com/2019/05/29/exploring-oslo-norway-grass-roots-square/

She glanced at Dad, a mixture of triumph as well as daggers. He made a I’ve-had-three-kids-nothing-surprises-slash-tires-me-anymore kind of face, as he scrutinized the sculptures.

In all modesty, she had seen quite the number of sculptures in the span of her 13 year old lifetime, though nothing compared- or rather embodied anything nearly as unique as this.

From a further prospective, it seemed as if slabs off of the pebble-gray pavement seemed as if it were levitating; although at intimate inspection, hundreds of thousands minuscule men- and women, had been bolstering the bottom.

Their sizes varied, depending on whether they had been maintaining the weight of stone; since the immensely minute figures seemed only to sprout in the stead of numerous blocks. Their tiny jade heads clustered together in order to embody a single large, lime slab.

Their minuscule mouths appeared to gape in agony as her brother layered the slab the tiny figurines were bearing with his rear. A flat, elevated surface was equivalent to an inanimate object worthy of bottom smothering. At least, through a certain someone’s eyes.

Numerous people swept by, not a single fleeting glance at the grass-like population that had literally been sculpted under their noses. Well, we’re definitely one to talk, although considering the multiple renovations that took place surrounding the area, it’d be considerably difficult for anybody to spot. Anybody who wasn’t trodding all over it, that is.

With the expanse of knowledge she had unveiled that day, something bubbled at the pit of her stomach; something of a melancholy melody. The world had ballooned a green 50,000 time’s bigger that day, for how would she ever make it, if tens of thousands of people; excluding those below five inches, were clambering for “it”? She knew the answer, although the thought of it sent bile belting up her throat. How? Well, first things first.

She’d have to try.

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Nobel Peace Center

I intend to leave after my death a large fund for the promotion of the peace idea, but I am skeptical as to its results. – Alfred Bernhard Nobel
Alfred Bernhard Nobel was a Swedish businessman, chemist, engineer, inventor, and philanthropist. Nobel held 355 different patents, dynamite being the most famous. The synthetic element nobelium was named after him.

 

Reading intently on what it takes to be a Nobel Peace laureate 
The Turknoy’s favorite Nobel Peace laureate – finally a realization that it takes a lot to become President of a Great Nation – far cry on what they always see in the news lately (fake or real …but but but BUT Disclaimer — there’s no such thing as a fake news — it’s news or not news at all! 
Reflection Questions for the kids    during their visit to the Nobel Peace Center.
1. Who is Alfred Nobel? Why was the Peace Prize named after him?
2. Who are your top 3 favorite Nobel Peace Laureate? Why?
3. What would you do in the future to win a Nobel Peace Prize? How? When?

 

The Nobel Peace Center is a showcase for the Nobel Peace Prize and the ideals it represents. The Center is also an arena where culture and politics merge to promote involvement, debate and reflection around topics such as war, peace and conflict resolution.
On the 5th April we at the Nobel Peace Center opened our new Exhibition KlimaLab, a vibrant exhibition about the climate, nature and people. It is an interactive experience for children and adults consisting of art installations you can touch, feel and even eat.

Quote on Obama’s Nobel speech acceptance ..on climate change..apparently, the kids favorite topic on how to win the Nobel Peace  Prize for their generation.

…the world must come together to confront climate change. There is little scientific dispute that if we do nothing, we will face more drought, famine and mass displacement that will fuel more conflict for decades. For this reason, it is not merely scientists and activists who call for swift and forceful action it is military leaders in my country and others who understand that our common security hangs in the balance.

Exploring Oslo,Norway: Tjuvholmen

 

Tjuvholmen is a neighborhood on a peninsula sticking out from Aker Brygge into the Oslofjord. At the tip of the peninsula, next to the sculpture park, is an outdoor bathing area. The water leads out to the Inner Oslofjord.

A very cloudy and rainy morning in Tjuvholmen. Tjuvholmen is a neighborhood on a peninsula sticking out from Aker Brygge into the Oslofjord

The  Tjuvholmen Square great for kids, there are a lot of non-conforming scenarios aka ideas that challenges the norm– from naked sculptures to messages around the dining areas – expect a good number of questions from traveling kids.

 

WHAT IF?? -If we killed humans at the same rate as we kill animals, it would take17 days to wipe out the entire human specifies.

Look up and play cool – kids are watching!
Tjuvholmen on a brighter day!
Tjuvholmen horse and our worldschooler with a big smile. 

 

Visit Oslo notes the  Tjuvholmen is a very recent addition to Oslo’s varied collection of boroughs. The buildings that make up the area are drawn by some 20 different architects, creating a concentrated display of current trends in architecture. Tjuvholmen is also characterised by elaborate outdoor spaces, including a city beach and several humorous outdoor artworks.At the point where Tjuvholmen meets the fjord you find one of Oslo’s main attractions, master architect Renzo Piano’s Astrup Fearnley Museum.Tjuvholmen may be knew in Oslo but this place will be the closest to our traveling family’s hearts in Oslo.

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Munchmuseet, Munch Museum

“From my rotting body, flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity.” – Edvard Munch

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts.

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts
The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

The Munch Museum has the world’s largest collection of Edvard Munch’s art, which is displayed in exhibitions where Munch’s art is put in relevant contexts

Edvard Munch was one of Modernism’s most significant artists

Edvard Munch was one of Modernism’s most significant artists

Edvard Munch was one of Modernism’s most significant artists. He is popularly known for his tenacious experimentation with painting, graphic art, drawing, sculpture, photo and film.

Munch was very good at portraying extreme emotions in painting, and he wanted to get a strong reaction from his viewers. His most famous work is “The Scream,” which definitely evokes intense feelings.

 

Munch left approximately 1,150 paintings,17, 800 prints,4,500 watercolours, drawings and 13 sculptures, as well as writing and  literary notes to Oslo, Norway. The city is currently constructing a bigger Munch Museum close to the Opera House where Museum 2020 will rise.

“A work of art can only come from the interior of man. Art is the form of the image formed upon the nerves, heart, brain and eye of man.” – Edvard Munch

 

 

On Family Values: Hope and Goals

“Hope is not a prognostication; it is an orientation that no matter how things turn out, they can have meaning.” –  Vaclav Havel

Family travelers are imparting the value of consistent hope. This is one of the many reasons we drag the kids around the world. Well, technically, just around Asia, Europe and North America for now. Hopefully, around the world soon enough.

This is our “Teddy Bear” in Doha airport, Hamad International Airport… the moment we pass this bear… hope hope hope Festival for all the very best out of our comfort zones!!
From one airport to the next (this time Oslo Airport) – one huge way to burst that comfort bubble!

When a traveling family run towards a train station hoping to catch the train on time, that’s hoping for the best.

When a traveling family is  almost get denied entry by an Immigration Officer to a country of destination because of visa application requirements concerns and all family members continue showing calm while presenting valid travel documents, that’s hoping for fairness and diplomacy.

When a first time family hikes in an unfavorable weather up a gorgeous landscape in a foreign country and keeps the hyper mood, that’s hoping for an awesome adventure.

When presented with a bad customer service and the traveling family maintain a good attitude towards all people, that’s hoping for the goodness of humanity.

Emily Dickinson may have written it in a poem  eras ago, but as family traveller, it is in our traveler’s literature pack.

“Hope”is a thing with feathers (By: Emily Dickinson) 

“Hope” is the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all –
And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard –
And sore must be the storm –
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm –
I’ve heard it in the chillest land –
And on the strangest Sea –
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Kon-Tiki Museum

“In my experience, it is rarer to find a really happy person in a circle of millionaires than among vagabonds.” – Thor Heyerdahl
Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947

Another Norwegian explorer breaking the ocean norm– why is that NOT surprising!

Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947. He is obviously an adventurer-at-heart, an ethnographer in profession with a background in zoology, botany, and geography. In his famous Kon-Tiki expedition in 1947, he sailed 8,000 km across the Pacific Ocean in a hand-built raft from South America to the Tuamotu Islands. The expedition was designed to demonstrate that ancient people could have made long sea voyages, creating contacts between separate cultures. Heyerdahl also proposed that Azerbaijan was the site of an ancient advanced civilization. He believed that natives migrated north through waterways to present-day Scandinavia.

In 1984, he was appointed a government scholar and further adventures followed with voyages on the Ra and Tigris reed boats.

Thor Heyerdahl rose to fame when he crossed the Pacific Ocean with the Kon-Tiki in 1947; This traveling girl’s first visit March 2018

Turknoys and Kon-Tiki, during their previous visit last winter (November 2018)

It’s fantastic to experience original rafts and up to date exhibitions on Heyerdahl’s expedition- the Kon-tiki, being the most famous, Ra, Tigris, Easter Island, Fatuhiva, Tucume, Galapagos, spelunking, under water exhibition and more!

 What a  really admirable explorer  Thor Heyerdahl. Probably the coolest Thor we’ve read about, way better than the one with the hammer.

Kon-Tiki, the greatest sea adventure of our time.
Kon-Tiki, the greatest sea adventure of our time.

More of Thor Heyerdahl’s famous quotes illustrate his determined and adventurous personality:

“Some people believe in fate, others don’t. I do, and I don’t. It may seem at times as if invisible fingers move us about like puppets on strings. But for sure, we are not born to be dragged along. We can grab the strings ourselves and adjust our course at every crossroad, or take off at any little trail into the unknown.” – Thor Heyerdahl

“Borders? I have never seen one. But I have heard they exist in the minds of some people.” – Thor Heyerdahl

And to the last quote, we concur…what borders?!

 

 

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Aker Brygge

We are all born in a little port but not all of us sail the vast oceans.” – Mehmet Murat íldan

View of Aker Brygge — an elegant neighbourhood in central Oslo, Norway

Aker Brygge is a neighbourhood in central Oslo, Norway. It is a popular area for shopping, dining and entertainment, as well a high-end residential area. For our family’s third visit to Oslo, we have chosen to enjoy these area and we didn’t regret this even for a tiny second.

Aker Brygge – their playground for 17 days! ❤️

Universe happens for us — we want a yacht and really, that’s not a lot. To be more specific, a Norway-based yacht 😄
cruises depart day in and day out for passing through the scenic Oslo Fjord.

At street level Aker Brygge a vibrant commercial district, and the large open-air areas and indoor shopping street are often used for photo exhibitions, concerts and pop-up events for fashion, art and culture.

For more than a century Aker Brygge was the site of a shipyard, Akers Mekaniske Verksted. The architecture at Aker Brygge is distinctive, with its combination of old, venerable shipyard buildings and modern architecture.

Part of the Central area, Aker Brygge’s pier is fabulous and majestic, to say the least. Eateries outdoor tables serve upscale Nordic, Italian or casual menus like burgers and steak. There are a lot of Oslo food trucks to choose from. A popular summer boat bar is moored nearby, ferries and cruises depart day in and day out for passing through the scenic Oslo Fjord.

Local cultural draws include the Nobel Peace Center, with exhibits on the famous prize and the striking Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.

 

Local cultural draws include the Nobel Peace Center still under renovation for more improvements!

Enjoying the almost midnight sun in Aker, Brygge Oslo, Norway

striking Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.

Aker Brygge is a port of happiness and elegance in Oslo, Norway!

Exploring Oslo, Norway: Vikingskipshuset, Viking Museum

Visit Vikingskipshuset for a face to face experience with some of the world’s greatest Viking treasures! The best preserved Viking ships in the world and unique burial artifacts from boat graves around Oslo Fjords. These ships have been on voyages of the sea before they became the final resting place to their wealthy owners.

Incredible woodcarvings, mysterious skeleton remains and Viking era mood; definitely out of the ordinary!

Face to face with some of the world’s greatest Viking treasures!
Incredible woodcarvings, face to face with Viking artifacts seem surreal 😀

 

The Ship Graves

The Viking Ship Museum houses four Viking ship burials from Oslo Fjord area: those found in Oseberg, Gokstad, Tune and Borre. All four were excavated  between 1852 and 1904. Three of the graves contained ships that have survived to this day, the Oseberg ship was built AD 820, the Gokstad ship shortly before AD 900 and the Tune ship AD 910.

The three ships had been at sea for several years before they were pulled ashore and used as burial ships. The dead were placed in burial chambers built on board the ships. They were buried with generous supplies of food and drink, various animals and a large number of objects

The Oseberg ship was used as grave ship for two women, while Gokstad and Tune servedas grave ships for men. Most of the objects in Oseberg and Gokstad graves were well preserved because the ships had been buried in moist ground and covered with clay and turf. Both Oseberg and Gokstad had been looted in the Viking Age; no jewelry or weapons were found.

The Discovery of the Oseberg Ship

The Oseberg ship burial was  discovered in the autumn of 1903 on the Lille Oseberg farm in Vestfold county. The following summer excavations were carried out, led by professor of archeology Gabriel Gustafson. While the excavation itself took five months, it would take 21 years to complete the conservation and  restoration of the ship and its grave finds.

The ship was complete but crushed when it was found, The many pieces had to be slowly dried before being pieced back together. The Vikingskipshuset consists of over 90% of the original wood.

Two Wealthy Women

When excavating the Oseberg Ship in 1904, the archeologist found the remains of two women. One of them could have been in her fifties when she died, the other around 70-80 years. But who is the main person in the grave?

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role. Their kin and community used the ship grave and the burial ritual and to mark the importance of the women. Is it possible that one of the women was sacrificed to accompany the other to the grave?

Both women were approximately 153 cm tall. The younger woman had healthy teeth with little sign of wear, indicating that she had enjoyed a good diet. Throughout her life she had used a metal toothpick to clean her teeth. A broken collar bone shows that was injured some  weeks before her death, but the skeletal remains do not reveal the cause of her death.

The skeleton of the older women shows signs that she had been seriously ill during childhood. In old age, she suffered from osteoporosis, a lumbar fracture, two fused neck vertebrae and a knee  injury, which most likely had made her stoop and walk with a limp. The woman suffered from advanced cancer, and had probably been in great pain in her final years.

 

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role

The Oseberg mound with its rich array of grave goods indicates that one or both of them played an important political – and perhaps also religious – role

Prototype and functional Oseberg Ship in Tonsberg, Norway